Unlike many Australian cities, Melbourne isn't known for visual landmarks. Rather, it's a collection of hundreds of smaller experiences that require time to discover. We knew that if we could just get people to spend some time there, they'd be sold. So, we created the Melbourne Remote Control Tourist, an interactive web campaign that let potential visitors explore the city for themselves through the eyes and ears of four real-world tourists.

Launch the campaign
Published
December 2013
Topics

    The Story

    Unlike many Australian cities, Melbourne isn't known for visual landmarks. Rather, it's a collection of hundreds of smaller experiences that require time to discover. We knew that if we could just get people to spend some time there, they'd be sold. So, we created the Melbourne Remote Control Tourist, an interactive web campaign that let potential visitors explore the city for themselves through the eyes and ears of four real-world tourists.

    Every core interaction with this campaign was through digital. Visitors were able to watch the five-day live event via Livestream, controlling their every move through multiple social platforms. In addition, they could explore Melbourne via the interactive Google Map and use its search functionality. The Remote Control Tourist website allowed us to bring the wonders of Melbourne to the world.

    The Technology

    The Results

    Over the five-day period, the Melbourne Remote Control Tourist generated over 43 million earned social media impressions, including 35 million from Twitter alone. We had people in 3,888 cities from 158 countries interacting with the site. Our tourists were responsible for almost 3,000 unique requests. They traveled 109 km, took over 1,500 Instagram photos, and checked in at 321 locations. Through hundreds of global news articles, social and PR, we estimate that the project had a global reach of over 235 million people.

    43

    Million earned social media impressions

    150

    Million global audience reach

    Launch Date Oct. 9, 2013