8 top advertisers explain what the streaming boom means for the industry

8 top advertisers explain what the streaming boom means for the industry

Guests
Tina Allan, Managing Director, Data Solutions at BBDO New York
Michael Bailey, Director, Digital Media at Google
Jill Baskin, Chief Marketing Officer at The Hershey Company
David Cohen, CEO at Interactive Advertising Bureau
Carla Eboli, EVP DE&I at Energy BBDO, DEI Lead at Omnicom
Andrés Ordóñez, Chief Creative Officer of FCB Chicago
Michael Sotelo, VP, Digital at Alma DDB
Stacey Stewart EVP and Managing Partner, Integrated Investment at UM Worldwide
Published
May 2021

As more and more viewers make the move from linear TV to streaming platforms, agencies and advertisers have had to transform their approaches to everything, from media planning to connecting with audiences. Here’s a look at how top industry leaders are making the most of streaming trends.

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[Music]

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David Cohen: There is no doubt

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that if you saw an ad in an environment

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that you have

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chosen to be in, in a topic area that you

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are highly passionate about,

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and that was an ad that was relevant at

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that time or at that moment,

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it would be very, very meaningful.

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Jill Baskin: I think it is the heart of what is driving

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all this,

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is that I can have personal choice, both

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both in when I view it

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and what I view. Michael Bailey: Ultimately, people expect

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customization, and they expect to be able

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to consume content

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that suits them or even subsets of

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content that they find

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most interesting.

1:02

[Music]

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Andrés Ordóñez: I think one of the things that 2020,

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and I'm thankful for this, it gave us all,

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it opens everyone's eyes to diversity.

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Carla Eboli: YouTube has always been very diverse

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as a platform. When we compare

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YouTube with other platforms, these

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aspects of people become even more

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evident because data analysis of ads

1:27

running on

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TV tell us that diverse people

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are not seeing themselves represented at all.

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Cohen: Generally, video has been used for big,

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broad,

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awareness-based activities. If you look

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at the other side of the equation,

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generally,

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social media has been looked at kind of

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lower funnel, hard-charging,

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sales-driving

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efforts. The ability for CTV to be the

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bridge that actually marries the best

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of both of those worlds:

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Brand advertising, sight, sound, and

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motion,

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highly emotive, but actually be able to

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do something about it,

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you know, be actually able to close

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the sale,

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close the loop. Stacey Stewart: We've certainly been able

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to

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better reach our specific targets,

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eliminating some of the waste

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and cutting down that frequency. So it's

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really about that incremental reach.

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The person who

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hasn't seen your ad yet or has only seen

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it once, and finding them in unique

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places, where you can build on that reach

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more impactfully rather than just build

2:37

the frequency of hitting those heavy TV

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viewers over and over.

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Michael Sotelo: The difference between broadcast was

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that we were trying to cast a larger net

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to a bigger audience.

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And now with the use of YouTube and

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other platforms like YouTube,

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we're able to deliver personalized

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content at scale

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to ensure that we are connecting with

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that consumer in a most personal way

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possible.

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Tina Allan: I think the opportunity, though, for

3:02

advertisers is,

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you know, stop thinking

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of a world in marketing that is one and

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done.

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It doesn’t, it doesn't start and stop.

3:13

You no longer can just do one thing or

3:15

say one thing.

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I'd like to walk around saying, and then what?

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And then what happens? And then what

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happens?

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Because as we talk about streaming, as we

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talk about always-on,

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we have to be the marketers who are

3:35

always, always-on.

More people are watching connected TV. YouTube creators explain what’s driving the trend